Roland Barthes Kills Double Zuksch: Street Music and Postmodern Representations

In a true representation of François Lyotard’s philosophy and his definitions of postmodernism as “questioning all the great claims of life,” artist Double Zukes begins his iconic song “Fakkak” by emphasizing its excessive subjectivity and skeptical ecstasy : … I feel my enemies in the beginning.” The intermittent narration that is not linked to a clear methodology recalls Umberto Eco’s position in his explanation of the postmodern position on the linguistic level, where he says: “The position of postmodernism is like a man who loves a very elegant woman, and know that he can’t tell her I love you, because he knows she knows (and she knows he knows) these words were written by Barbara Cartland.” The song engages in rejection and sarcasm and devotion to the concepts of power and does not care about positioning in any prior framework, so that chaos becomes the only system that can describe all this confusion.
Double Zukash goes further by undermining all that is stable and says: “Disciples ….. It’s all about relaxation … even if the curriculum is easy of the cheap kind.” In a clear semiotic sign, Double Zukash creates a state of parallelism between the curriculum and life, to describe it in the end as the cheap curriculum, and then goes after it: “We are geniuses, but without instruction.” And another parallel case with a deep existential tendency, when he says: “We decided and started implementation.”

The song continues with an expressive spectacle packed with clear intent, and largely continuous as the artist dances with a group of rejects and marginalized people to wobbly music that explodes with strong rhythms inside a crowded and stalled bus; So the words came back again: “Oh my dear… I want you to understand, my dear… I’m in a good mood, but I’m in a state of chaos… I’m out of the meter closed… Someone is more than the boys. ” This scene is based on Roland Barthes’s theories in which he responded to de Saussure, that language is more comprehensive and extensive than symbol; Since the symbol does not achieve its purpose without a language that guarantees its positioning in a clear interpretive format, this is what Double Zukash achieves in his intermittent words that structurally establish a comprehensive interpretive framework, where the stopped bus, the marginalized and the gold chains on the necks… In another framework, Double Zukash digs deep into the patterns of interpretation, He is inspired by the theories of psychoanalyst Jacques Lacan related to discourse and the unconscious, where the latter argues that the unconscious is mainly based on linguistic patterns is based. Double Zuksch presents Jacques Lacan’s theories as a justification for the state of metaphorical intensification that does not depend on a clear intentionality: “My mood is sweet, but I am in a state of flux… I am locked in the counter… I’m still a steady steady.”

Double Zuksch, in his definition of madness, is keen to create a paradox with Jacques Lacan’s vision, which states: “The madman is not the one who has lost his mind, but the one who has lost everything but his mind .” While Lacan creates importance for the systems that accompany the mind, Double Zukesch destroys the mind itself in clear pretexts to empower his discourse and authoritarian outlook.

In a case that is as close as possible to intertextuality, he goes on to define his position on women and love, but within a well-defined intellectual framework: “I love women and I hate late women,” because this undermines all the constants that accompanied by it. with “six” and elevates the meaning of “mis,” which within the context’s connotations is linked to the destruction of limitations and the tendency to break away from frameworks, and in the same context Double Zukash is keen to explore the conceptual system of love to destroy: “Be sure… I am like this and you love me so much… My relationships are multiple… I don’t like you to take it… Understand the matter, your understanding is slow… I hope you don’t mind … It took you two days. Three for many… and I fly, I fly, I fly, I fly, I fly.” Dubbel Zuksch’s consumerist view refers us to the sociologist Zygmunt Baumann and his statements about liquid love and materialistic teachings, where a person replaces his overwhelming material pleasure with his existential anxiety. Dubbel Zuksch’s understanding of the dominant cultural logic of late capitalism and the theorization of philosopher Frederic Jameson leads to this consumerist view of love and life. The semantic pattern in the song escalates and takes on a more systematic character in self-expression: “I don’t walk the world with my tongue… I don’t have a brainache… It’s easy for me to raise the weapon … I am not worried about what he said and said… Al-Bait says words… and people are stable.” Dubbel Zukes does not seem interested in determining only an epistemological and philosophical framework for the idea and meaning of life; Rather, it destroys the entire epistemological system, since “the tongue is a brainache.” This rhetorical condensation strongly refers us to the philosophy of the absurd; Where man’s efforts to search for meaning end in inevitable failure, so that the absurd bullet that “Double Zukach” fires from his picked up weapon is the same bullet that was fired by “Messault”, the hero of Albert Camus in his novel “The Stranger”.
Double Zuksch, in his definition of madness, is keen to create a paradox with Jacques Lacan’s vision, which states: “The madman is not the one who has lost his mind, but the one who has lost everything but his mind .” While Lacan creates importance for the systems that accompany the mind, Double Zukesch destroys the mind itself in clear pretexts to empower his discourse and authoritarian outlook.
The last part of the song recalls Michel Foucault’s statements about the language of madness and the danger of a person thinking through a specific language. On Mars there is nothing but lifeless… I don’t remember you. Tell me who are you? I’m a lion.. I’m Aw… Eddie Jamid… I came to you… Wake up… You’re beaten… Eddie Jamid… I came.”
Double Zukach achieves a model of powerful discourse and a rejection of reality in a sign language that does not monitor life itself as much as it monitors the bumps and the absurdity that surrounds it.
He did it with one word; Specific format and clear meaning (jaw).

Jordanian writer

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