PGA Tour Introduces Move to Keep LIV Golfers Out of FedEx Cup Playoffs


Talor Gooch is one of three LIV golfers looking to compete in the FedEx Cup Playoffs

The PGA Tour has accused a number of LIV Golf rebels of creating an emergency after they filed a lawsuit demanding the suspension be lifted so they can play in the lucrative FedEx Cup playoffs at the end of the season can play

A hearing for the temporary restraining order is scheduled for Tuesday in San Jose, California, after the tour immediately banned all those involved with the Saudi-backed separatist range.

The antitrust suit includes 11 suspended players, most notably six-time champion Phil Mickelson and 2020 US Open champion Bryson DeChambeau, but only three of those players – Taylor Gooch, Matt Jones and Hudson Swafford – are seeking a comeback. . In the FedEx Cup Playoffs.

There is a $75m (£62m) bonus for the three tournament series, with the eventual winner taking home $18m (£15m).

“Prosecutors waited nearly two months to seek relief in court, creating an ’emergency’ they now claim requires immediate action,” the PGA Tour statement said.

US Presidents Cup captain Davis Love III has hinted at a major player boycott if LIV golfers can return to the PGA Tour

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US Presidents Cup captain Davis Love III has hinted at a major player boycott if LIV golfers can return to the PGA Tour

US Presidents Cup captain Davis Love III has hinted at a major player boycott if LIV golfers can return to the PGA Tour

“Despite knowing full well that they would violate tour regulations and be prevented from doing so, the plaintiffs joined the rival golf league LIV Golf, which paid them tens and hundreds of millions of dollars in guaranteed money provided by the Saudi- sovereign wealth fund was provided. their transgressions.

“The (temporary restraining order) plaintiffs are now in court for a mandatory injunction to force them into the tour’s season-ending FedEx Cup qualifiers, an action that would harm all tour members who follow the rules.

“Antitrust laws do not allow plaintiffs to have their cake and eat it too”.

Several current players discuss the 11 golfers who challenged the PGA Tour

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Several current players discuss the 11 golfers who challenged the PGA Tour

Several current players discuss the 11 golfers who challenged the PGA Tour

The PGA Tour emphasizes that Rebel players have known since June 9 that joining LIV Golf would result in a suspension, and that not every suspended player pays to play in FedEx.

“In a telling sign, several other LIV players, including four other plaintiffs in this case, realize there are no contingent or irreparable damages; They also qualified to play in the FedEx Cup, but did not ask the court for the extraordinary exemption sought by this proposal.”

“Players’ participation in the LIV League violates the PGA Tour (handbook),” Elliott Peters, senior advisor to the PGA Tour, said in a statement.

“For the massive sums of cash provided by the sovereign wealth fund of Saudi Arabia, the plaintiffs willingly breached their agreements with the PGA Tour.

“The alleged damage to players is completely self-inflicted.”

LIV golfers are suing the PGA Tour

Mickelson and 10 other players sued the PGA Tour

Mickelson and 10 other players sued the PGA Tour

Phil Mickelson and Ian Poulter were among 11 LIV golfers who filed a monopoly lawsuit against the PGA Tour last week to challenge their suspension.

The lawsuit states that “the operation of the tour serves no other purpose than to cause harm to players and prevent entry to the first significant competitive threat the tour has faced in decades.”

“The purpose of this action is to repeal the anti-competitive rules and practices of the PGA Tour that prevent independent contract golfers from playing whenever and wherever they want.”

In response, the PGA Tour released a memo to players written by commissioner Jay Monahan in which he described the 11 golfers as former teammates who “walked away from the tour” and are now “employees of the Saudi Golf League.”

“We have prepared to protect our membership and challenge this latest attempt to disrupt our tour, and you should be confident in the legal merits of our position,” Monahan wrote.

Ian Poulter and Lee Westwood say they are unsure about their Ryder Cup status

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Ian Poulter and Lee Westwood say they are unsure about their Ryder Cup status

Ian Poulter and Lee Westwood say they are unsure about their Ryder Cup status

“With the Saudi Golf League at a standstill, they are trying to hire lawyers to join our members in good standing in the competition. This is an attempt to use the Tour platform to promote themselves and to get your benefits and efforts freely.

“Re-allowing access to our events is detrimental to the tour and the competition, to the detriment of our organisation, our players, our partners and our supporters. The lawsuit they brought somehow expects us to believe otherwise, so we intend to make our case clear and strong.

“This is your tour built on the idea that we work together for the good and growth of the organization…and then reap the rewards. Your former colleagues seem to have forgotten an important aspect of that equation.”

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