Jameel Clinic offers a scientific breakthrough in the early detection of Parkinson’s disease symptoms

Researchers at the Jameel Clinic at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have revealed that they have successfully developed an artificial intelligence-based model that can detect Parkinson’s disease by analyzing the breathing patterns of people being examined. It is known that Parkinson’s disease is considered one of the most difficult diseases in terms of diagnosis because its discovery mainly depends on the appearance of certain motor symptoms such as tremors, stiffness and slowness of movement, and these symptoms often appear several years after infection with the disease, which led a research team led by Professor Dina Katabi and Nicole Pham, a professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) at MIT and a senior researcher at the Jameel Clinic, to pioneer this technology that can detect Parkinson’s disease by monitoring the breathing patterns of potential patients.

Jameel Clinic, a center for artificial intelligence and healthcare at MIT, established in 2018 through a partnership between MIT and Community Jameel, an independent global organization that advances science to help communities thrive in a rapidly changing world, aims to to innovate AI-based technologies that will transform the healthcare landscape by developing early diagnosis methods, discovering new drugs and building care systems that focus on meeting and managing patients’ personalized needs.

The new tool is designed in the form of a neural network that uses a series of linked algorithms and simulates the way the human brain works, and is able to detect the occurrence of Parkinson’s disease through the sleep patterns of the person being investigated. The neural network, which was trained by MIT doctoral student Yuji Yang with researcher Yuan Yuan, is also able to determine the severity of Parkinson’s disease and track its development over time.

Today, Nature Medicine published a detailed description of the tool’s mechanism of action through a new research paper supervised by Professor Dina Katabi, an associate member of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory at MIT and director of the Wireless Networks and Mobile Computing Center, with the participation of Yang and Yuan. and 12 other fellows from Rutgers University, University of Rochester Medical Center, Mayo Clinic, Massachusetts General Hospital, and Boston University School of Health and Rehabilitation.

Over the past years, researchers have attempted to devise ways to detect Parkinson’s disease using cerebrospinal fluid and neuroimaging, but these methods are not suitable for repeated tests that can provide early diagnosis or regularly track disease progression, and it is excessively expensive. Surgical measures are rarely available except in specialized medical centers.

According to the MIT researchers, the diagnostic test for Parkinson’s disease with the help of artificial intelligence can be performed at home every night while you sleep, without any devices having to be connected to the subject’s body. To do this, the team developed a device similar to a home Wi-Fi router, but instead of providing an Internet connection, the device sends out wireless signals, analyzes their reflections in the surrounding environment, extracts the subject’s breathing patterns and then sends signals Breathing into the neural network to determine the possibility of developing Parkinson’s disease, all without the patient or caregiver having to make any effort.

Professor Dina Katabi, a researcher at the Jameel Clinic at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, said: “Dr James Parkinson was the first to suggest a link between Parkinson’s disease and breathing since 1817, which encouraged us to study the possibility of detecting the disease through breathing patterns rather than movement patterns. Some medical studies have also shown that symptoms of the disease appear years before the development of motor symptoms on the respiratory system, which means that breathing patterns can be promising in assessing the possibility of developing Parkinson’s disease before symptoms appear.

Parkinson’s disease is the fastest spreading neurological disease in the world, and the second most common neurological disorder after Alzheimer’s disease. In the United States alone, the disease affects more than one million people annually, placing an economic burden of $51.9 billion per year. The research team hopes that the new tool will contribute to reducing the number of infections through this innovative algorithm, which has already been tested on 7,687 individuals, including 757 patients with Parkinson’s disease.

Al-Qatabi added: “In terms of drug production, these results could open the door to clinical trials of much shorter duration and with the participation of fewer volunteers, which will ultimately lead to the acceleration of new treatments for this disease. In terms of clinical care, we hope this innovation will help strengthen screening mechanisms for Parkinson’s patients in underserved communities, especially those who live in rural areas or have difficulty leaving their homes due to limited mobility or cognitive impairment.”

Ray Dorsey, professor of neuroscience at the University of Rochester and co-author of the paper, said: “It is unfortunate that we have not made any therapeutic breakthroughs over this century, which suggests that our current methods of evaluating new therapies are not as good as intended. We had very limited information about the mechanism of disease progression in the brain, but the device she invented Professor [قتابي] This now enables us to obtain valuable and factual information by examining patients in their homes, and I am not exaggerating when I say that [جهاز فحص مرض باركنسون الحالي] It’s like a lamp in the pitch dark that opens a beam of light for us…and a sensor [قتابي] Completely contactless helps us walk confidently in this darkness.”

This research was conducted as a collaboration between the University of Rochester, Mayo Clinic and Massachusetts General Hospital, sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, and supported in part by the National Science Foundation and the Michael J. Fox Foundation.

Over Jameel Clinic:

Jameel Clinic, a center for artificial intelligence and healthcare at MIT, established in 2018 through a partnership between MIT and Community Jameel, an independent global organization that advances science to help communities thrive in a rapidly changing world, aims to to innovate AI-based technologies that will transform the healthcare landscape by developing early diagnosis methods, discovering new drugs and building care systems that focus on meeting and managing patients’ personalized needs.

About Jameel Community:

Community Jameel strives to advance science to help societies thrive in a rapidly changing world.

Community Jameel was founded in 2003 as an independent global organization to continue the journey of philanthropy and community service that the Jameel family began in Saudi Arabia since 1945.

Community Jameel supports scientists, humanitarian workers, technologists and innovators to understand and address pressing human challenges in areas such as climate change, health and education.

The efforts supported by Community Jameel have led to significant new innovations and achievements; The most notable was the discovery of the new antibiotic “Halicin” by the Jameel Clinic at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; The Jameel Institute at Imperial College London’s contribution to the creation of modeling templates that were critical to combating the spread of COVID-19, as well as the achievement for which the co-founders of the Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab at MIT the Nobel Prize was awarded for their success in developing an approach that contributes to global poverty alleviation. communityjameel.org

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